Tag Archives: technology

EVENTS: Technology Trends 2012 (by UNWIRED) 20/21 March, London, UK

I’d like to thank my friends at Unwired for their kind invitation to attend “Technology Trends 2012” next week. I believe that some of the sessions are now sold out, but if you have yet to book, check it out. Here is the full PDF. (contacts – see below. Speak to Isabel).

These short sessions, at breakfast, or at lunch, really seem to work for busy professional diaries. If, like me, you don’t actually live in London, then of course the lunchtime slot is favourite. I’ll be there on Wed 21st at 12.30, if you are going. And £99+vat is good value for a jam-packed high tech briefing session.

The strapline is, “What will new technologies hold for the workplace in 2012, and how could these innovations affect your business – A condensed review of the latest technology and innovations from CES, ISE and CeBIT 2012”

And there is the clue to this event’s value – it is a round up of what Unwired’s experts noted from these three key events:

CES is “the major US consumer electronics show, held in Las Vegas (100,000 visitors!!), including manufacturers, developers and suppliers, of consumer technology hardware, content, technology, delivery systems and related products and services….”

ISE is the “Top European event for professional AV and electronic systems integration”, held in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) with 25,000 visitors, and according to Unwired is an “industry defining event”

CeBITis “The world’s largest electronic tradeshow” held in Hannover (Germany) this month, with 480,000 (!!) visitors….OK, rather them than me…. but now you don’t have to go, just listen to the Unwired guys instead, who say the event is “the showcase for digital IT and telecommunication solutions and launch pad for new technologies and innovations”.

This is what Unwired says about the event:

 This key briefing will summarise the new technology and trends for 2012. Book now and join companies including GlaxoSmithKline, Barclays, HSBC, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Catlin Group, Drivers Jonas Deloitte, Foster + Partners, Nokia, Lloyd’s and Severn Trent Water.

This is a must attend event for anyone involved in creating effective working environment. Learn about technology enablers and drivers of change. What are the key technologies being adopted by organisations to enable workplace innovation and how can you future proof your workplace strategies?

Our expert commentators will be covering three of the world’s biggest technology exhibitions and will present you with an enjoyable review of the latest innovations together with an analysis of their impact on work, the work process and workplace (or other markets such as home, retail, education or healthcare).

And here is a bit of advertising, but worth noting….

UNWIRED is the knowledge division of Cordless Group. It provides a range of resources to allow our clients to predict the impact of new technology on business, people and the built environment.

UNWIRED publishes a range of reports, guides, white papers and a monthly newsletter. It also holds regular executive briefings, workshops, thinktanks, training and technology demonstrations.

For information and further details please contact Isabel Dewhurst-Marks by phone on +44 (0)20 8977 8920 or email: isabel.marks@unwired.eu.com

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Mobile freedom, or enslavement?

Those of us that seek to promote the benefits of agile working or flexible working see the exploitation of mobile technologies as the main enabler of change. Most of us possess a smart phone or laptop and use them regularly, throughout each working day and beyond.

Sales of the iPad, and similar competitive tablet devices, are rocketing. Corporate organisations are considering their mobile IT support strategies. There can be little doubt that we are becoming entranced by the immediate access to information and communication. It all looks great as a means of freeing us from the shackles of working at specific places and at specific times. But, is their a downside?

MIT psychologist, Professor Sherry Turkle (http://www.linkedin.com/pub/sherry-turkle/14/522/982) drew a different side to the potential impact of these technologies. In her book “Alone Together –Why we expect more from Technology and less from each other” – she draws upon the research she has done over the 40 years of the computer age. She speaks of many of her subjects who have withdrawn into using technology as their main means of communicating with “family and friends”. Throughout that period, technologies have replaced what were rich, direct, face to face conversations with a blitz of superficial messages delivered in a way which avoid people from confronting another person directly. Many young people today live their lives around social network sites and would rather text their friends than speak to them on the phone or directly face to face.

Whilst reading her book on my iPad (!) on a commute into London the other day, I glanced up to look at my other travellers and found a good 80% in my carriage were doing something with their BlackBerries/iPhones.   Again, this week we saw in an Ofcom (UK) report, “A Nation Addicted to Smartphones“, a real concern over addiction to the smart phone. Apparently, over a quarter of adults and nearly half of teenagers in the UK own a smart phone, and 81 per cent use it to make calls every day. Not to say that this is bad in itself, but Ofcom estimates that 37 per cent of adults and 60 per cent of teenagers in theUK say that they are ‘highly addicted’. The mind boggles with the  statistic – 22 per cent of adults use their smart phone in the bathroom.

In China, where there are estimated to be over 400m users connected to the internet, the authorities were so concerned over addiction to the internet that in 2005 a residential unit was set up in Beijing – now there are 200 organisations in China offering a variety of therapies from bootcamps to electro-shock treatments. ‘Wired’ covered this last year, in an article “Obsessed with the Internet: a tale from China“.

Internet Addiction Disorder, recognised in the mid-1990s, is being considered by psychologists as being now sufficiently serious to add to the official list of mental disorders, as covered in this academic journal.

Another symptom of our addiction that we all experience is the email overload problem of which we all suffer and complain, but only add to by our own behaviour.

So how do we manage our addictive behaviours, that enslave us in technologies that offer the opportunity for so much freedom?

Do we ban their use when in meetings and during meals? Do we have smart phone free zones such as in cinemas? Do we treat excessive use as a mental disorder? Do we, perhaps, put health warning messages on phones?

Whatever the solution, we need to be mindful of the risks that our own behaviour towards these technologies presents, and we need to moderate our dependency. Consideration of others, and “doing to others what you would wish to be done by” wouldn’t be a bad way of thinking.

Author: Graham Jervis, PhD, is a Director of Advanced Workplace Associates Ltd, London, UK

http://www.linkedin.com/in/grahamjervis